Prince William, Duke of Cambridge

 

Prince Willian Arthur Philip Louis – (b. 1982) is the eldest son of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer, Princess of Wales.

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge

is

Anne’s 12th cousin 2x removed.

                 
Prince William of Wales
Born         H.R.H. Prince William Arthur Philip Louis
Spouse
Catherine “Kate” Elizabeth Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge
(m. 2011)
Issue
  • Prince George, Duke of Cambridge
  • Princess Charlotte of Cambridge
  • Prince Louis of Cambridge
House
  • Windsor
Father Prince Charles of Wales
Mother Diana, Princess of Wales
William was educated at four schools in the United Kingdom and obtained a degree from the University of St Andrews. He spent parts of a gap year in Chile, Belize, and some parts of Africa. In December 2006, he completed 44 weeks of training as an officer cadet and was commissioned in the Blues and Royals regiment. In April 2008, he qualified as a pilot by completing pilot training at Royal Air Force College Cranwell. He then underwent helicopter flying training in order to become a full-time pilot with the RAF Search and Rescue Force in early 2009. His service with the British Armed Forces ended in September 2013.
William married Catherine Middleton on 29 April 2011 at Westminster Abbey. Hours before the wedding, he was created Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Strathearn, and Baron Carrickfergus. The couple have two children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, and are expecting their third in April 2018.
William was born at Lindo Wing of St Mary’s Hospital, London, on 21 June 1982 at 9:03 pm as the first child of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to Queen Elizabeth II, and Diana, Princess of Wales. His names, William Arthur Philip Louis, were announced by Buckingham Palace a week later on 28 June. He was baptised in the Music Room of Buckingham Palace on 4 August (the 82nd birthday of his paternal great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother) by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Robert Runcie. He was the first child born to a Prince and Princess of Wales since Prince John in 1905. William was affectionately called “Wombat” by his parents or “Wills” (the latter a name coined by the press).
William has been second in the line of succession since birth. At age seven, he reportedly told his mother that he wanted to be a police officer when he was older so that he might be able to protect her; a statement to which his brother Harry responded: “Oh, no you can’t. You’ve got to be King.” William’s first public appearance was on 1 March 1991 (Saint David’s Day), during an official visit of his parents to Cardiff, Wales. After arriving by aeroplane, William was taken to Llandaff Cathedral where he signed the visitors’ book, thereby demonstrating that he was left-handed. On 3 June 1991, William was admitted to Royal Berkshire Hospital after being accidentally hit on the side of the forehead by a fellow student wielding a golf club. He did not lose consciousness, but suffered a depressed fracture of the skull and was operated on at Great Ormond Street Hospital, resulting in a permanent scar. In a 2009 interview, he dubbed this scar a “Harry Potter scar”. He was reported to have said, “I call it that because it glows sometimes and some people notice it other times they don’t notice it at all”.
His mother wanted him and his younger brother Harry to have wider experiences than are usual for royal children. She took them to Walt Disney World and McDonald’s as well as AIDS clinics and shelters for the homeless. She bought them typical teenage items, such as video games. Diana, who was by then divorced from Charles, died in a car accident in the early hours of 31 August 1997. William, then aged 15, along with his brother who was 12, and father, was staying at Balmoral Castle at the time. The Prince of Wales waited until his sons woke the following morning to tell them about their mother’s death. At his mother’s funeral, William accompanied his father, brother, paternal grandfather and maternal uncle in walking behind the funeral cortège from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey.
William began to accompany his parents on official visits at an early age. In 1983, he accompanied his parents on an overseas tour to Australia and New Zealand, a decision made by the Princess of Wales that was considered to be unconventional; not only was William so young, but both the first and second in line for the throne would be travelling together.
Education: William was educated at independent schools, starting at Jane Mynors’ nursery school and the pre-preparatory Wetherby School, both in London. Following this, he attended Ludgrove School near Wokingham, Berkshire, and was privately tutored during summers by Rory Stewart. At Ludgrove he also participated in football—along with swimming, basketball, clay pigeon shooting, and cross country running. William sat the entrance exam to Eton College and was admitted. There, he studied Geography, Biology and History of Art at A-Level, obtaining an ‘A’ in Geography, a ‘C’ in Biology and a ‘B’ in History of Art. At Eton, he continued to play football, captaining his house team, and took up water polo. The decision to place William in Eton went against the family tradition of sending royal children to Gordonstoun (William’s grandfather, father, two uncles, and two cousins all attended); however, Diana’s father and brother had both attended Eton. The Royal Family and the tabloid press agreed that William would be allowed to study free of paparazzi intrusion in exchange for regular updates on the Prince’s life. The chairman of the Press Complaints Commission, John Wakeham, said of the arrangement: “Prince William is not an institution; nor a soap star; nor a football hero. He is a boy: in the next few years, perhaps the most important and sometimes painful part of his life, he will grow up and become a man.”
After completing his studies at Eton, William took a gap year, during which he took part in British Army training exercises in Belize, worked on English dairy farms, visited Africa, and for ten weeks taught children in southern Chile. As part of the Raleigh International programme in the town of Tortel, William lived with other young volunteers, sharing in the common household chores, including cleaning the toilet, and also volunteered as the guest radio jockey for the local radio station.
By 2001, William was back in the United Kingdom and had enrolled at the University of St Andrews. News of this caused a temporary increase in the number of applications to St Andrews, mostly from young women who wanted an opportunity to meet him. The extra attention did not deter him, though, and he embarked on a degree course in Art History, later changing his main subject to Geography, and going on to earn a Scottish Master of Arts degree with upper second class honours. While at university, he represented the Scottish national universities water polo team at the Celtic Nations tournament in 2004. He was known as “Steve” by other students to avoid any journalists overhearing and realising his identity.
William returned to St Andrews in February 2011 as patron of the university’s 600th Anniversary Appeal.

To prepare for eventually managing the Duchy of Cornwall Estate, in 2014 William enrolled in a vocational agricultural management course at Cambridge organised by the Cambridge Programme for Sustainability Leadership (CPSL), whose patron is his father, the Prince of Wales. The estate is a “£760 million (about $1.25 billion) entity established in 1337 to provide a private income for use by the reigning monarch’s eldest son”, which William will inherit when his father becomes King.